Women's Heart Health

Finding new ways to eat healthy doesn’t have to be a tough nut to crack. Just grab yourself a handful of walnuts, almonds or pistachios and you’ll be well on your way to improving your heart. Over time, these snacks can help lower cholesterol, reduce the buildup of plaque in the arteries and prevent blood clots. Try eating nuts a few times a week to reap the greatest nutritional benefit. For other heart-healthy foods, check out the latest issue of AtlanticView >




Women's Heart Health Programs and Screenings

Education and prevention can keep you and your loved ones healthy.  We invite you to take advantage of the programs, support groups and screenings available. Unless otherwise noted, to register for any of these programs call 1-800-247-9580 Monday through Thursday between 8:30am to 8:00pm and Friday between 8:30am and 4:30pm, or sign-up online at Atlantic Health System’s classes and events registration; all programs are free unless a fee is indicated.

Heart Failure Support Group
Heart failure patients and caregivers can meet to share experiences and discuss concerns. Refreshments will be provided.
Fourth Tuesday of every month; 12:30 to 2:00pm
Gagnon Cardiovascular Institute, Level C, Wilf A Conference Room
For more information and to register, please call 973-971-7901.
 
Support Group: Navigating the Milrinone Journey
Patients and caregivers can learn about treating heart failure with the drug known as Milrinone. Refreshments will be provided.
Second Monday of every month; 12:30 to 2:00pm
Gagnon Cardiovascular Institute, Level C, Wilf A Conference Room
For more information and to register, please call 973-971-7901.
 
Blood Pressure and Glucose Screening
Learn your numbers and how to reduce your risk for heart attack and stroke. This program is free and registration is not required.
 
First Friday of every month, Noon to 3:00pm
Parsippany Shop Rite, 808 Route 46, Parsippany
 
Fourth Friday of every month, Noon to 3:00pm
Shoprite of Greater Morristown, 178 East Hanover Avenue, Cedar Knolls, NJ
 
Smoking Cessation
Receive the support and guidance needed to quit smoking in six weeks. This group is free and open to all adults in the community, but registration and a smoking assessment are required to participate.
Carol G. Simon Cancer Center, Radiation Conference Room
For class dates and to register, please call 973-971-7971 or 973-971-5781.
 
Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR)
This highly-acclaimed, nine-week program can help you take control of the anxiety and chronic conditions affecting your life. Please bring a yoga mat.
Tuesdays, 6:00 to 8:30pm
Wednesdays, 10:00am to 12:30pm
Chambers Center for Well Being, 435 South Street, Morristown, NJ
For more information and to register, please call 973-971-4890.
 
Lifestyle Change Program
We all know that a healthy lifestyle will help you feel and look your best. In this 12-week program, you’ll learn how to reach and maintain all of your fitness, weight and wellness goals using supervised exercises, stress management and the nutrition plan of renowned physician Joel Fuhrman, MD.
Fee: $775 ($400 deposit required)
Mondays and Wednesdays
Program times: 8:00 to 10:00am, 9:00 to 11:00am, 10:00am to Noon, 11:00am to 1:00pm, 4:00 to 6:00pm, 5:00 to 7:00pm and 6:00 to 8:00pm
Chambers Center for Well Being, 435 South Street, Morristown, NJ
For more information and a schedule, please call 973-971-4890.
 
The Dean Ornish Program for Reversing Heart Disease
This 9-week, outpatient program is scientifically proven to stop and even reverse heart disease through optimizing nutrition, stress management, fitness and social support. Eligible patients include those who have had a cardiac episode, such as open-heart surgery, a stent or stable angina. Medicare and other insurance companies cover this program.
Chambers Center for Well Being, 435 South Street, Morristown, NJ
For a schedule and to register, please call 973-971-7230.
 
Mended Hearts
A monthly support group for heart disease patients and caregivers; cardiac physicians and allied health professionals will discuss topics on heart health. Registration is not required.
Fourth Sunday of every month, 1:30 to 3:00pm                                     
Gagnon Cardiovascular Institute, Wilf Conference Room
 
WomenHeart of Morristown Medical Center
This national organization is dedicated to advancing women’s heart health. Join our monthly meetings for education, peer-to-peer patient support and access to local resources. Light refreshments are served.
Second Thursday of every month at Gagnon Cardiovascular Institute:

 Chambers Center for Well Being
The Chambers Center for Well Being can help you develop a personal plan for a healthier lifestyle. Through lectures, classes and therapeutic services, we’ll show you how stress management, proper dietary balance and increased exercise can improve your overall well-being – mind, body and spirit. View a full list of classes, services and related fees > or call 973-971-6301.


Women's Heart Health Articles
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Women's Heart Health

Air pollution coupled with colder temperatures may deliver a double whammy to women's hearts, making them more prone to sudden cardiac death, a new study suggests.

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Women's Heart Health

Women who survive a heart attack are less likely than men to receive cholesterol-lowering statin drugs that can reduce the risk of another heart attack or stroke, a new study finds.

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Women's Heart Health

Certain drugs prescribed to treat high blood pressure may boost a woman's risk for developing pancreatic cancer after menopause, new research suggests.

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Women's Heart Health

Eating lots of vegetables may help older women keep their blood vessels healthy, Australian researchers report.

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Women's Heart Health

New research finds that, for women over 60, there's a link between long-term use of antibiotics and heightened odds for heart-linked death.

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Women's Heart Health

Warning signs of heart disease in women, such as fatigue, body aches and upset stomach, may be shrugged off as symptoms of stress or a hectic lifestyle.

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